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Blade Shapes and Tangs

 

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KWG Site Map > Home Page > index > Blade Shapes

Clip Point – A clip point blade has a concave or straight cut-out at the tip (The "clip"). This brings the blade point lower for extra control and enhances the sharpness of the tip. You will often find a false edge with the clip point. These types of blades also often have an abundant belly for better slicing capabilities.

Dagger/Double Edge - A double edge blade is sharpened on both sides ending with the point aligned with the spine, in the middle of the blade.

Drop Point – The drop-point blade has lowered tip via a convex arc. This lowers the point for extra control and also leaves the strength. This type of blade also has a good-sized belly for better slicing.

Hook Blade – The edge of a hook blade curves in a concave manner.

Santuko – Is a Japanese chef’s knife. The spine curves downward to meet the edge and the belly curves slightly.

Scimitar – This is a curved blade with the edge on the convex side.

Sheepsfoot – The spine of this blade curves downward to meet the edge. This leaves virtually no point. This type of blade typically has little or virtually no belly and is used  mainly for slicing applications.

Spear Point – The point of this blade is exactly in the center of the blade and both edges are sharpened. The point drops all the way down the center of the blade.

Tanto – The point to this style blade is in line with the spine of the blade. This leaves the point thick and strong. There are quite a few different variations of how tanto blades are designed. The way the front edge meets the bottom edge, whether at an obtuse angle or a curve is one difference. You will also find differences in the point being clipped or not and whether there is a chisel grind.

Trailing Point – The trailing point blade’s point is higher than the spine. This is typically engineered with an extended belly for slicing, with the point up and out of the way.


Blade Shapes article above contributed by Tracy Togliatti 
Used With Permission of Author
eBladeStore.com
Email Tracy: Tracy@eBladeStore.com                                           ©Tracy Togliatti

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Types of Tangs on Knives

The tang is an extension of the blade that is covered by the handle or has scales attached. For folding knives, the tang would be found below the shoulder and contains piercing for the hinge pin on which the blade pivots.

Full Tang – A full tang is the width of the handle and is designed to have scales (sides) attached pinned or riveted into it.

Push Tang – This is a partial tang that is pushed into and secured to the handle.

Encapsulated Tang – This tang is smaller than the handle. The handle is fitted around it.

Rat-Tail Tang – the rat-tail tang narrows down to a point at the butt/pommel, and is screwed into the handle at that point.

Full Tang Bevel – This is a full tang that has a bevel running the entire length of the blade full to the butt/pommel.

Hidden Tang – This is a partial push tang that is sometimes referred to as a hidden tang.


Type of Tangs article above contributed by Tracy Togliatti 
eBladeStore.com
Email Tracy: Tracy@eBladeStore.com                                        ©Tracy Togliatti

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